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One of many movies in the line of Disney Channel’s bro-on-bro turf wars with secondary tokenized female characters.If the women in Johnny Tsunami are important, it’s only because they are love interests — a prize to be won during a sporting event at the film’s climax.But the girl, Jessica Olson, is really just mean here!She’s particularly rude to young pop star Christopher Wilde’s jovial rapper/driver/best friend.

The in-line skating turf wars film Brink may be the most beloved DCOM, but is it actually feminist? This was the last alpha male DCOM sports movie before Rip Girls started the era of the girl power sports flick. The movie’s creators were aiming for the classic rom-com setup, in which the smart, overlooked girl doesn’t fall for the guy who everyone wants, so then obviously he falls in love with her.Also worrisome: Christopher Wilde’s mom is a caricature of a “bitchy businesswoman.” By the end of the movie, we were left hoping that Christopher Wilde would just return to Hollywood to find someone to be nice to him and finally escape the paparazzi.We like that this film rejects the nerdy Asian stereotypes that Disney Channel has enforced in the past in favor of a homecoming queen hopeful played by the beautiful Brenda Song.We realize that feminism is a belief system that informs actions, not a scale upon which people or art can be ranked from "most " to "least." That said: In this genre that most might classify as somewhere between intellectual junk food and artistic garbage, there are a wide and nuanced range of feminist messages to be gleaned. In this supposed coming-of-age story, a spoiled rich, young man is condemned to a Montana ranch after being the worst host ever to his kid cousin. This boy is given so many chances to turn his act around.Even worse, there’s a sequel with roughly the same premise, so clearly he does not change his ways!

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